……

Her first two films, Unrelated and Archipelago, had a fearsome stillness and surgical eye for the mores of the English middle class. Both starred Tom Hiddleston, in his first film roles before becoming the fiendish Loki in the Avengers movies. To him, what set Hogg apart was her grasp of the “strange truths” of families, her knowledge that “real life is often mysterious”.

……

There were few visitors. On alternate Saturdays, one was Tom Hiddleston – cast in a small but pivotal role as a butter-smooth estate agent. He first met Hogg in 2005, a fortnight after leaving drama school. In 2012, he joined her after working weeks spent at Shepperton making Thor: The Dark World.

He emails to discuss his role. First was a period of research, a mastery of conveyancing and contract management. “A lot of work for a small part, but I didn’t want to screw it up.”

Albertine’s discomfort may have been unavoidable. Sharing their clothes and creating their dialogue, Hiddleston writes, “you can’t help but pour parts of yourself into Joanna’s characters, to the extent that sometimes by the end of the shoot, it’s all begun to feel alarmingly real.”

Yet Exhibition sounds not unlike a trip home. “A big budget studio film can feel necessarily like a military operation. Joanna’s set feels like a family.”

……

Tom Hiddleston Interview at Olivier Awards 2014 by Sky News

With Only Lovers Left Alive, British actor Tom Hiddleston teams up with Tilda Swinton and director Jim Jarmusch to wrestle the vampire genre back from the Twilight crowd, with Hiddleston and Swinton starring as two moody, music-obsessed bloodsuckers who can’t live without each other.

Was there any hesitation about stepping into the vampire world?

Absolutely none. It was amazing. I met Jim Jarmusch in November 2011, and I’d just finished shooting Avengers, and I was in New York for War Horse, which was just opening, and I was about to shoot the Shakespeare plays for PBS. So there (were) superheroes and soldiers and Shakespeare, and I met Jim and he said, “I’m going to make a film about love, and it’s about two very delicate, sophisticated creatures who love music and poetry and nature. He’s a kind of rock star musician who’s also a kind of scientist and physicist, and she’s a poet. Oh, and by the way, they’re vampires (laughs).” The vampire theme was really a framing for Jim to attempt a narrative about this theme of love, acceptance, time, creativity and mortality.

When you first watched the film with an audience, were you surprised people found it so funny?

It was really pleasing, actually, because we wanted there to be levity and lightness in it, and humour, but not in a way that seemed to be overreaching. We didn’t want to seem like we were pandering to the audience in bad taste, which would dilute the integrity of the attempt. And the attempt was really to make something very delicate and sophisticated and refined about love and acceptance and time and art and music and poetry. These are big themes, and we didn’t want to seem heavy-handed. Jim wanted to be very light on his feet. So hearing the laughter is thrilling, truly, because when you’re delivering deadpan stuff about the literature of the world, you want people to get it.

I loved that John Hurt plays Christopher Marlowe.

Yeah, it’s a lovely joke that Christopher Marlowe is still alive and well, living in Tangier with a portrait of Shakespeare on his wall with a knife through (his) head.

We asked Hiddleston if he had to choose between looking at Tilda Swinton or Chris Hemsworth all day, who would he choose.

“The dance is different, but I love dancing with both of them,” he said laughing.

Tom Hiddleston Threatens to One Day Play a Normal Guy
By Amy Nicholson Wednesday, Apr 9 2014
Tom Hiddleston can pull off extreme looks. In The Avengers, he strutted around in Loki’s two-foot horned helmet. For Midnight in Paris, he finessed F. Scott Fitzgerald’s prim finger waves. And in his latest, Jim Jarmusch’s vampire romance Only Lovers Left Alive, Hiddleston lounges bare-chested in velvet-cuffed robes. The only style he can’t swing — at least, as far as casting directors seem to think — is modern, everyday mortal.
Consider his last 12 months. As if out to prove his range, the 33-year-old British actor played a god in a Marvel blockbuster (Thor: The Dark World), took Only Lovers to Cannes, clocked three months performing Coriolanus in a 250-seat London theater that was once a banana-ripening house, and, three days after the closing curtain, bounced to Toronto, where he’s shooting the Victorian ghost story Crimson Peak with Guillermo del Toro. (“He’s like a great Mexican bear,” he laughs. “I hug him every day, repeatedly.”) Even with all that, there’s a huge swath of things he has yet to do: contemporary thrillers, clever dramedies, romantic comedies, and anything, well, normal.
"It’s crazy, because I was born in 1981 and I’m alive and well in 2014 — it’s not that I’m conscientiously not doing contemporary stuff," insists Hiddleston. "I think it’s really difficult to make a good romantic comedy. I’d love to play them; they just don’t tend to come my way at the moment. I’m taking it as a compliment one way or another, but it’s very much an ambition of mine to wear jeans."
Today, Hiddleston is on the phone from Canada. But in person, it’s startling to discover that filmgoers have yet to behold Hiddleston’s electric charisma and shock of blond curls. His movies prefer him dark-haired, dark-tempered, and cerebral. The typecasting is understandable: He does, after all, casually reference Milan Kundera and 19th-century poet John Clare in conversation. At the University of Cambridge, he earned a double first in Classics and, for fun, pondered how to rework The Odyssey and The Iliad as films. Meanwhile, his Tumblr fans have hoisted him up as the thinking girl’s dreamboat, second only to Benedict Cumberbatch. Imagine if he had a crack at the scripts that made a star of Hugh Grant.
For now, audiences who want to see him in a rom-com can make do with Only Lovers Left Alive, a love story in which Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton play glamorous, long-married vampires reconnecting after a few years apart in Michigan and Morocco. Moody and romantic, it could be subtitled From Here to Eternity (For Serious). “And some people find it funny,” Hiddleston adds with a dry chuckle.
Swinton is the older woman, a 2,000-year-old Druid named Eve. Hiddleston plays Adam, a blood-drinking Byronic hero made immortal, naturally, during the Romantic age. Sexy and sulky, he’s spent the last several centuries mastering every instrument before migrating to modern-day Detroit where his long hair, pale skin, tight pants, and emo attitude help him pass as a reclusive rock star.
"We were creating this kind of cocktail of Gothic romance," says Hiddleston. "And once all those elements were there, we just shook it up and started shooting." Picture a post-millennial version of that glory-hog Lestat. Or really, picture one part Keith Richards to six parts Jim Jarmusch himself.
"He seems to have poured so much of himself into the screenplay," says Hiddleston of his writer-director, who spent seven years pushing the project. Adam’s obsessions are Jarmusch’s obsessions: music, science, the secret biology of mushrooms. They share the same heroes — Bach, Tesla, Newton, Iggy, Hank (as in Williams) — each framed and hung on their own Wall of Fame. By channeling his personality into a fictional character that will, film format willing, outlive all of us, Jarmusch has created his own version of artistic immortality. Notes Hiddleston, "For Jim, I think that really is all that matters."
Adam and Eve are proof of why all vampires are cool — they’ve had eons to master impressive talents while earning a this-too-shall-pass insouciance. In the film, the hipper-than-thou couple spend their nights driving around Detroit in a Jaguar SJS, name-dropping famous friends like Christopher Marlowe and digging into heady topics like stars in the sky that emit musical signals. That’s how we might imagine them hanging out even without a camera, though Hiddleston swears that the intimidating Swinton is “enormous, enormous fun,” and equally game to chit-chat about the cinnamon bagels at the craft services table.
Often, though, they talked about the future and what they wished they could live long enough to witness. “The world is changing at an astonishing rate. Will Detroit have a second wind? What cities will last and what will not? And how fast is it all going to come? What language will we all be speaking in 100 years time?” wonders Hiddleston. “There’s an interesting line in the film where Adam asks Eve, ‘Have the water wars started yet, or is it still about the oil?’ I won’t be around to see it, I’m afraid.

"If I lived forever, who knows what I would do?" he continues. "I would certainly get better at the piano. I would try to learn how to paint. I think I would try to read all the books I haven’t read. When I was a child, the house was full of books — the walls were lined with bookshelves — and I remember looking up at them once and thinking, ‘I wonder if I’ll ever be able to read all those books?’ and my mother said, ‘It’s all right; you’ve got loads of time.’ But actually we don’t have that much time — I know I won’t. There will be things I’ll miss out on."
For now, his focus is on maximizing his newfound spare time. “Every six months for the last three or four years, I’ve been playing Loki,” says Hiddleston. “This is the first year where I won’t make a Marvel film for three years.” Sure, he can’t read every book ever written, but his increasing clout will make sure he doesn’t miss out on any role he’d like to play. Maybe even one that will let him keep wearing his Levi’s.

Tom Hiddleston Threatens to One Day Play a Normal Guy

By Amy Nicholson Wednesday, Apr 9 2014

Tom Hiddleston can pull off extreme looks. In The Avengers, he strutted around in Loki’s two-foot horned helmet. For Midnight in Paris, he finessed F. Scott Fitzgerald’s prim finger waves. And in his latest, Jim Jarmusch’s vampire romance Only Lovers Left Alive, Hiddleston lounges bare-chested in velvet-cuffed robes. The only style he can’t swing — at least, as far as casting directors seem to think — is modern, everyday mortal.

Consider his last 12 months. As if out to prove his range, the 33-year-old British actor played a god in a Marvel blockbuster (Thor: The Dark World), took Only Lovers to Cannes, clocked three months performing Coriolanus in a 250-seat London theater that was once a banana-ripening house, and, three days after the closing curtain, bounced to Toronto, where he’s shooting the Victorian ghost story Crimson Peak with Guillermo del Toro. (“He’s like a great Mexican bear,” he laughs. “I hug him every day, repeatedly.”) Even with all that, there’s a huge swath of things he has yet to do: contemporary thrillers, clever dramedies, romantic comedies, and anything, well, normal.

"It’s crazy, because I was born in 1981 and I’m alive and well in 2014 — it’s not that I’m conscientiously not doing contemporary stuff," insists Hiddleston. "I think it’s really difficult to make a good romantic comedy. I’d love to play them; they just don’t tend to come my way at the moment. I’m taking it as a compliment one way or another, but it’s very much an ambition of mine to wear jeans."

Today, Hiddleston is on the phone from Canada. But in person, it’s startling to discover that filmgoers have yet to behold Hiddleston’s electric charisma and shock of blond curls. His movies prefer him dark-haired, dark-tempered, and cerebral. The typecasting is understandable: He does, after all, casually reference Milan Kundera and 19th-century poet John Clare in conversation. At the University of Cambridge, he earned a double first in Classics and, for fun, pondered how to rework The Odyssey and The Iliad as films. Meanwhile, his Tumblr fans have hoisted him up as the thinking girl’s dreamboat, second only to Benedict Cumberbatch. Imagine if he had a crack at the scripts that made a star of Hugh Grant.

For now, audiences who want to see him in a rom-com can make do with Only Lovers Left Alive, a love story in which Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton play glamorous, long-married vampires reconnecting after a few years apart in Michigan and Morocco. Moody and romantic, it could be subtitled From Here to Eternity (For Serious). “And some people find it funny,” Hiddleston adds with a dry chuckle.

Swinton is the older woman, a 2,000-year-old Druid named Eve. Hiddleston plays Adam, a blood-drinking Byronic hero made immortal, naturally, during the Romantic age. Sexy and sulky, he’s spent the last several centuries mastering every instrument before migrating to modern-day Detroit where his long hair, pale skin, tight pants, and emo attitude help him pass as a reclusive rock star.

"We were creating this kind of cocktail of Gothic romance," says Hiddleston. "And once all those elements were there, we just shook it up and started shooting." Picture a post-millennial version of that glory-hog Lestat. Or really, picture one part Keith Richards to six parts Jim Jarmusch himself.

"He seems to have poured so much of himself into the screenplay," says Hiddleston of his writer-director, who spent seven years pushing the project. Adam’s obsessions are Jarmusch’s obsessions: music, science, the secret biology of mushrooms. They share the same heroes — Bach, Tesla, Newton, Iggy, Hank (as in Williams) — each framed and hung on their own Wall of Fame. By channeling his personality into a fictional character that will, film format willing, outlive all of us, Jarmusch has created his own version of artistic immortality. Notes Hiddleston, "For Jim, I think that really is all that matters."

Adam and Eve are proof of why all vampires are cool — they’ve had eons to master impressive talents while earning a this-too-shall-pass insouciance. In the film, the hipper-than-thou couple spend their nights driving around Detroit in a Jaguar SJS, name-dropping famous friends like Christopher Marlowe and digging into heady topics like stars in the sky that emit musical signals. That’s how we might imagine them hanging out even without a camera, though Hiddleston swears that the intimidating Swinton is “enormous, enormous fun,” and equally game to chit-chat about the cinnamon bagels at the craft services table.

Often, though, they talked about the future and what they wished they could live long enough to witness. “The world is changing at an astonishing rate. Will Detroit have a second wind? What cities will last and what will not? And how fast is it all going to come? What language will we all be speaking in 100 years time?” wonders Hiddleston. “There’s an interesting line in the film where Adam asks Eve, ‘Have the water wars started yet, or is it still about the oil?’ I won’t be around to see it, I’m afraid.

"If I lived forever, who knows what I would do?" he continues. "I would certainly get better at the piano. I would try to learn how to paint. I think I would try to read all the books I haven’t read. When I was a child, the house was full of books — the walls were lined with bookshelves — and I remember looking up at them once and thinking, ‘I wonder if I’ll ever be able to read all those books?’ and my mother said, ‘It’s all right; you’ve got loads of time.’ But actually we don’t have that much time — I know I won’t. There will be things I’ll miss out on."

For now, his focus is on maximizing his newfound spare time. “Every six months for the last three or four years, I’ve been playing Loki,” says Hiddleston. “This is the first year where I won’t make a Marvel film for three years.” Sure, he can’t read every book ever written, but his increasing clout will make sure he doesn’t miss out on any role he’d like to play. Maybe even one that will let him keep wearing his Levi’s.

Ben you recently announced some big news with the casting of Tom Hiddleston in your adaptation of  J.G. Ballard’s High-rise. How did this all come about and what can we expect?

Ben Wheatley: Well there’s a book that has many clues in it.

[Much laughter ensues, but I guess the subtext is that Wheatley may be aiming to stay very true to the book, or possibly in spirit at the least as he gives it his own original Wheatley flavour.]

OK! What took you so long seems as the material seems written for you.

Ben Wheatley: Yeah. Well it has always been a favorite book of mine. It was really random how it kind of happened. You know, sometimes you have to be a bit of a chancer with these things I saw it on my shelf and thought that’s good no one has made a film of it I wonder why? I phoned my agent and within three days I was talking to Jeremy Thomas who said - Yeah I’ve got the rights to it.

And I went oh okay that’s cool, and he said yeah. It was that quick really. We looked around to see who would fit the part - Tom Hiddleston. So then we asked him and he said yeah I would love to do that.

He had just made Only Lovers Left Alive with [Jeremy] Thomas as well, so all the planets were very much aligned. Which was great.

I’m hoping it’s going to be pretty crazy, the film. It’s back to the Ken Russell days if we can.

Edith Bowman: When are you filming

Ben Wheatley: I’m not sure yet it’s a little merry dance of regional financing at the moment. We keep looking at the script and thinking I can’t quite believe we’re getting away with this - but we’ll find out.

I was hoping to delve into what level of pressure of expectation, if any Ben felt in his approach to adapting High Rise as J. G. Ballard and particularly the much loved/admired High Rise has a fanatical following, additionally amongst recent Ballard adaptations two were taken on by two giants of cinema Steven Spielberg with Empire of the Sun and David Cronenberg with Crash. As well as if any other casting decisions had been made yet. But we took a different but as interesting route.

Why did you think Tom Hiddleston was perfect for the part?

Ben Wheatley: If you read the book the Robert Laing character is very Hiddlestoney or very Hiddlestonian, I suppose. It’s that thing of control, but there’s a spark behind Hiddleston of perversity as well. Which he plays full-bore with Loki. There is something about him which is establishment but is also wild,which is what we liked about him a lot. 

Tom Hiddleston sings like a pirate (by Disney Fairies) [HD 1080P]

In this extra scene from ‘The Pirate Fairy,’ Tom Hiddleston, as a young Captain Hook, sings ‘The Frigate that Flies,’ and discusses the motivations of the nefarious pirate he portrays in the film.

And when he sings of the ship’s masts, Hiddleston points joyously to the studio ceiling. The only thing that could possibly make this better would be if he were wearing a puffy pirate shirt instead of his dapper white button-down.

(x)